Events

Media Studies Fall 2021 Events

Media Studies Fall 2021 Lecture Series

The Digital Dead Yard: Articulating Caribbean Loss and Mourning Online
by Professor Kelly Baker Josephs
Moderated by Professor Minoo Moallem, Director of Media Studies
September 30th, 2021 / 12:00pm – 1:30pm PST
Zoom Registration Link: https://bit.ly/2VIVTin

This presentation theorizes Caribbean cultural production in communal digital spaces, with a particular focus on the “digital dead yard,” a virtual space for healing, mourning, and memory. This work is part of a larger project, Caribbean Articulations: Storytelling in a Digital Age, that examines how technologies have helped not only to forge a Caribbean literary aesthetic but also to shape the very idea of the Caribbean as a region simultaneously bound by and situated beyond conventional geographic and temporal boundaries.

Kelly Baker Josephs is Professor of English at York College, CUNY, and Professor of English and digital humanities at the CUNY Graduate Center. She is the author of Disturbers of the Peace: Representations of Insanity in Anglophone Caribbean Literature (University of Virginia Press, 2013), co-editor of The Digital Black Atlantic (University of Minnesota Press, 2021), and co-organizer of the annual Caribbean Digital conferences.

This event is co-sponsored by the African American Studies Department and the Center for New Media.    

Soul-Assemblage Media
by Professor Laura U. Marks 
Moderated by Professor Minoo Moallem, Director of Media Studies
October 28th, 2021 / 4:00pm – 5:30pm PST
Zoom Registration Link: https://bit.ly/3CXJfgD

This talk will introduce my concept of the soul-assemblage, a gathering of beings organic and inorganic, material and immaterial, that enter into coalitions healthy and unhealthy. Soul-assemblages exist at hyper-local, planetary, and cosmic scales. I’ll explain the soul-assemblage’s roots in the thought of Leibniz, Deleuze, Glissant, and Sadra and show how it is useful aesthetics, personal improvement, and activism. Media too are soul-assemblages, gathering together infrastructures, movies, and audiences, and I will describe the particularly intensive and salubrious soul-assembled gathered around a small-file movie of no more than 5 megabytes, of the sort we screen at the Small File Media Festival.

Laura U. Marks works on media art and philosophy with an intercultural focus and an emphasis on appropriate technologies. She is the author of four books, most recently Hanan al-Cinema: Affections for the Moving Image, and co-founder of the Substantial Motion Research Network. She led the research group Tackling the Carbon Footprint Streaming Media and founded the Small File Media Festival. She programs experimental media art for venues around the world. Marks teaches in the School for the Contemporary Arts at Simon Fraser University in Vancouver. 

This event is co-sponsored by the Center for New Media

Media Studies Fall 2021 poster - final

Media Studies Fall 2021 Affiliated Events

The Center for New Media’s History and Theory of New Media Lecture Series presents:
Advancing Hollow Bone Narratives through Media Platform Connectedness
with Ruth Hopkins, Dakota/Lakota Sioux writer
October 11th, 2021 / 6:30pm – 8:00pm PST
Zoom Registration Link: https://bit.ly/3izCZU5

Learn about advocacy imbued with Indigenous spirituality and how ancestral voices are speaking to the world through social media.

Ruth Hopkins is a grassroots Dakota/Lakota writer and enrolled member of the Sisseton Wahpeton Sioux Tribe. She is also a biologist, tribal attorney, former judge, and co-founder of Lastrealindians.com, which was the beginning of on the ground action via social media organizing for Indian Country. Ruth resides on the Lake Traverse Reservation in South Dakota.

This History and Theory of New Media Lecture is part of the Indigenous Technologies initiative. Co-sponsored by Media Studies, American Cultures, the Arts Research Center, and The American Indian Graduate Program.

For more information, please visit the Center for New Media page for the event.